Digital History & Research Success

IMG_0503IMG_0510

A few weeks ago in my Digital History class, we were fortunate enough to have guest speaker Mark Tovey come in and teach us a bit about how to digitally reconstruct historic buildings and locations. Specifically, I was excited to find out that the architectural plans that I found at the County of Oxford Archives pertaining to the old County of Oxford Jail would be of a HUGE benefit for me.

In the digital history class we are working on individual projects pertaining to historic buildings and/or sites. We are expected to use new digital formats and digitize the building the best we can. I have decided to create an interactive timeline using the program Capzles for the first half of the project. For the second I intend to learn how to use Sketch-Up through the numerous instructional Youtube videos that I have come across and then digitally reconstruct the building and create a virtual tour. A tall order I know, but I think that the jail is incredibly important as one of the Woodstock Court House Square buildings and through my research I have found newspaper articles pertaining to the “Save the Jail” campaign. The jail was slated for demolition but the people of Woodstock would not allow that to happen. I will go into detail about the “Save the Jail” campaign in my project.

In order to digitize my building I need the architectural drawings which I have access to at the County of Oxford Archives. I have found not only the elevation drawings, but also the plans for the ground, first, and second floors. I also have section drawings and aerial views which will make it easier to recreate the building inside and out. I will be able to import the drawings into Sketch-Up and then recreate the building according to the measurements and specifications on the drawings.

Below are a few of the drawings I have access to:

Front ElevationIMG_0403IMG_0393IMG_0386

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Digital History & Research Success

    1. I was able to find more articles from the archive fighting the demolition of the jail and can’t wait to get them uploaded to the timeline!! I’ll let you know when I make it public!

  1. If you look up above the reception desk in the jail, you will see that the ledges are of different widths at the top story. I’m told that one was wider so that the convicted criminal to be hanged could stand there and leave room behind him for the pusher.
    As for the stories of the Blandford-Blenheim swamp murders, I don’t know if the murderer was in this jail – dates might be an issue – but do know the trail was so popular that the proceedings were moved to the upper story of the current Museum building where a display has items made from the gallows once used and disassembled.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s